April172014
dilettantepickle:

thenovl:

You know when you read something and you have to stop every other page because you want to read it out loud to the person sitting next to you?
This is like that. Only you’re the person sitting next to us and we can’t read it out loud because this book doesn’t come out until January!
Grrr. C’est la vie.
Holly Black’s The Darkest Part of the Forest marks her triumphant return to her faerie roots, and will be out January 13, 2015. Until then here’s a taste:

Children can have a cruel, absolute sense of justice. Children can kill a monster and feel quite proud of themselves. A girl can look at her brother and believe they’re destined to be a knight and a bard who battle evil. She can believe she’s found the thing she’s been made for.
Hazel lives with her brother, Ben, in the strange town of Fairfold where humans and fae exist side by side. The faeries’ seemingly harmless magic attracts tourists, but Hazel knows how dangerous they can be, and she knows how to stop them. Or she did, once.
At the center of it all, there is a glass coffin in the woods. It rests right on the ground and in it sleeps a boy with horns on his head and ears as pointed as knives. Hazel and Ben were both in love with him as children. The boy has slept there for generations, never waking.
Until one day, he does…
As the world turns upside down, Hazel tries to remember her years pretending to be a knight. But swept up in new love, shifting loyalties, and the fresh sting of betrayal, will it be enough?

And this cover! Beautiful, right?


LORDY LORDY THIS IS GORGEOUS

Oh God I love the cover!!

dilettantepickle:

thenovl:

You know when you read something and you have to stop every other page because you want to read it out loud to the person sitting next to you?

This is like that. Only you’re the person sitting next to us and we can’t read it out loud because this book doesn’t come out until January!

Grrr. C’est la vie.

Holly Black’s The Darkest Part of the Forest marks her triumphant return to her faerie roots, and will be out January 13, 2015. Until then here’s a taste:

Children can have a cruel, absolute sense of justice. Children can kill a monster and feel quite proud of themselves. A girl can look at her brother and believe they’re destined to be a knight and a bard who battle evil. She can believe she’s found the thing she’s been made for.

Hazel lives with her brother, Ben, in the strange town of Fairfold where humans and fae exist side by side. The faeries’ seemingly harmless magic attracts tourists, but Hazel knows how dangerous they can be, and she knows how to stop them. Or she did, once.

At the center of it all, there is a glass coffin in the woods. It rests right on the ground and in it sleeps a boy with horns on his head and ears as pointed as knives. Hazel and Ben were both in love with him as children. The boy has slept there for generations, never waking.

Until one day, he does…

As the world turns upside down, Hazel tries to remember her years pretending to be a knight. But swept up in new love, shifting loyalties, and the fresh sting of betrayal, will it be enough?

And this cover! Beautiful, right?

LORDY LORDY THIS IS GORGEOUS

Oh God I love the cover!!

April152014

fuckyeahlesbianliterature:

[image description: a set of eight lesbian pulp covers, all with ridiculously cheesy and dramatic covers and titles]

I think I might need wallpaper like this.

(Source: lockeslee, via malindalo)

April122014
April42014
“After the third [beer], I am likely to announce that all writing is fantasy anyway: that to set any event down in print is immediately to begin to lie about it, thank goodness; and that it’s no less absurd and presumptuous to try on the skin of a bank teller than that of a bigfoot or a dragon.” Peter S. Beagle, in the introduction to The Fantasy Worlds of Peter Beagle (via greenseer)

(via thirdarchive)

April32014
“After the third [beer], I am likely to announce that all writing is fantasy anyway: that to set any event down in print is immediately to begin to lie about it, thank goodness; and that it’s no less absurd and presumptuous to try on the skin of a bank teller than that of a bigfoot or a dragon.” Peter S. Beagle, in the introduction to The Fantasy Worlds of Peter Beagle (via greenseer)

(via thirdarchive)

March292014

theallycarter:

indigo-teen:

My favourite mystery/thriller series is Ally Carter’s Heist Society!

10 Reasons why you should read Heist Society

1. It’s like Teen Oceans 11.
2. Kat and Gabrielle are awesome, smart girls that you’ll wish you could have as BFFs.
3. W.W. Hale the Fifth AKA Hale. (He’s like Gansey, but instead of hunting for Dead Welsh Kings Hale helps Kat and her crew steal things and return them to their rightful owners.)
4. Short cons, long cons, all the cons!
5. Fictional heists of real art from real places, which a lot of cool historical facts.
6. Family is important in these novels.
7. They’re funny books.
8. International Adventures.
9. All three books are out, so no waiting.
10. Did I mention Hale?

- Chandra

I approve!

All good reasons. And in the spirit of teen Ocean’s 11 I’ll add
#11. They’re really fun!

March282014
March262014
March142014

imaginarycircus:

batgirlincorporated:

dynastylnoire:

lastrealindians:

Due to an extremely deadly winter here on the Northern Plains, a winter which has claimed the life of a tribal member, we are raising funds to deploy 20 home pilot projects to receive multi-fuel stoves to replace dependency on fossil fuels to heat our homes (namely propane). We will grow our fuel source and manufacture our own fuel sources in the immediate future to start this shift to renewables. We send our condolences to the family of the lady we lost to a home which could not afford to be heated. Google “Standing Rock propane crisis” for more info. email us at lastrealindians@gmail.com with any questions. We thank you genuinely. Lila wopila.

There are 7 days left to donate to the Heating the Rez campaign! You can still contribute here: http://www.indiegogo.com/projects/heating-the-rez

BOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOST

Fandoms have raised millions for individuals to make a videogame  (you know who you are) as well as fund movies and comics in a span of a few days. Let’s bring that kind of attention and readiness to people who actually need the help.

Boost it!

They made their goal, but I’m donating because I am sure they could use it. Campaign ends on 3/20/14. Until then, please consider signal boosting.

Boosting

(via annathaema)

March102014

Let Me Be Your Star: The Evolution of LGBTQ Protagonists in Young Adult Literature

diversityinya:

By Steven dos Santos

Author Steven dos Santos
[Image: Author Steven dos Santos]

Once upon a time, I wished upon a star, a luminous heavenly body, so I could follow my own star, my destiny, and see people like me as stars, playing the lead roles in stories filled with excitement and wonder.

I can’t tell you how empowering it feels to have finally reached the top step of the slippery publication staircase, staring down on my long journey, breathless, clutching copies of  my debut novel, The Culling, the first book in my Post-Apocalyptic The Torch Keeper series (which was recently chosen as a Top Ten Selection of the American Library Association’s Rainbow List), and the newly released sequel, The Sowing.

Life’s good now.

But it wasn’t always so.

Ever since I was a child, I had a passionate love of story in all its forms. Even before I could read on my own, I still remember the excitement of tearing open the shrink wrap of a storybook album, back in those ancient days when we had those vinyl Frisbees called records. I would sit enthralled for hours and listen through the tinny speakers of my portable plastic record player, as narrators spun wondrous tales of cursed Princesses, genies, fairies, giants, evil witches, mischievous gnomes, etc.

It was the heroic and handsome Princes, however, that always captivated most of my attention, though at the time, I wasn’t quite sure why. Part of me wanted to be like them, for sure, charging in on my white horse and saving the day from darkest peril. But another part of me which I never spoke of, wondered what it would be like to be the object of their quest, the one awoken from a long enchanted sleep by true love’s first kiss like Sleeping Beauty and Snow White, or whose foot fit the glass slipper like Cinderella’s.

No matter how many stories I devoured, however, I never came across one that ended with two Princes sharing an enchanted kiss, let alone riding off into the sunset together to a sparkling castle in the clouds. The child I was just accepted that these feelings I had must be wrong and I shoved them inside an ivory tower room in my mind, locked away year after year, growing mossy vines while awaiting rescue by a Prince that, it would seem, would never come.

Looking back on it now, I can see the absurdity of the homophobic rhetoric, that pontificates that somehow children will be “turned gay” if they are exposed to same-sex couples. If growing up with heterosexual parents and being bombarded with tale after tale of opposite-sex love in storybooks and animated movies wasn’t enough to turn a gay kid like me and millions of others heterosexual, then  there obviously isn’t enough magic for the converse to be true.

It wasn’t until I hit puberty, though, that the The Mystery of Steven’s Fascination With Heroic Princes was solved at last.

I was one of them.

I still cringe at the memory of how the epithets that were hurled at me as an adolescent burned into the very fiber of my being. Ugly words like SissyFaggotMaricon branded me with their hatefulness, more potent than any storybook witch’s vile curses. I was ostracized by many of my classmates and became extremely introverted, escaping into the refuge of literature. But now that I was older, I saw the glaring absence of people like me in stories as confirmation that somehow those slurs were true. People like me weren’t worthy enough to be heroes in books, and that plunged me deeper into depression.

I felt pretty much alone.

One of the things that helped me through this tumultuous time during my school years was my love of writing, everything from short stories, scripts, and even plays. Fast forward to 2002 when I wrote my very first novel, a middle grade fantasy story called Darius Devine & The Necromancer’s Curse, a throwback to my childhood love of fairy tales.

But Darius never had its happy ending. Despite numerous submissions, Darius Devine & The Necromancer’s Curse didn’t sell. In the meantime, I started noticing that Young Adult novels with gay protagonists were slowly beginning to emerge. Books such as Alex Sanchez’ Rainbow Boys (2003), Brent Hartinger’s Geography Club (2004) and David Levithan’s Boy Meets Boy (2005) had helped pave the way for gay characters in mainstream literature. These books dealt with important issues for gay youth, including coming out and self-acceptance. Finally, gay teens were seeing themselves represented in literature, something I had always dreamed about.

As inspiring as this new wave of stories was, however, I wanted something different, to move beyond the “problem” aspect of being gay, and have gay characters be the stars of their own adventure, suspense, fantasy, and horror stories, just like their heterosexual brethren.

In 2007, I decided to take a shot at just that kind of Young Adult novel, and wrote a paranormal, espionage adventure tale entitled Dagger, after the main character. The manuscript featured a gay teen who goes to High School during the day, and belongs to a secret, supernatural spy group that takes him all over the globe at night to combat the forces of evil.

I did derive some hope that the world had evolved and was ready for a gay Young Adult heroThat same year, the late Perry Moore published his novel, Hero, featuring a gay superhero. Things were changing. The time for gay characters in teen literature had arrived.

Once Dagger was finished in 2008, I started querying agents— and started receiving passes. Of course, I received some rejections citing the publication of Moore’s book, basically saying that the quota for a “gay hero” Young Adult novel had been filled, as if there were only one novel featuring heterosexual heroes in the market place.

One agent said she loved it, but could never sell it. Cryptic.

Then another agent’s response shed some light on this reaction and really shattered me:

Read More

Amen.

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